I have sold a property at 609 168 ESPLANADE AVE E in North Vancouver.
GREAT VIEWS OF VANCOUVER HARBOR & THE CITY OF VANCOUVER! FRESHLY PAINTED, clean and ready to move in! SUPER CLEAN & EXCELLENT LAYOUT at 1,131 sq foot 3 Bed, 2 Bath apartment with quick possession possible. A lovely SOUTH WEST corner unit featuring 9 foot ceilings, A/C, upgraded laminate flooring, kitchen granite countertops, large gourmet kitchen w/ stainless steel appliances. Enjoy what Lower Lonsdale has to offer w/ all of its restaurants & shops. 5 Minutes Walking distance to the Seabus, the Lonsdale Quay, the Night Market & Waterfront Park. Don't miss out on this one, CALL NOW FOR SHOWINGS!
Read Full Story
I have sold a property at 204 1009 HOWAY ST in New Westminster.
In one of New Westminster's best locations we have this quiet SUPER CLEAN AND LARGE 1Bed/1Bath, pet friendly second floor unit with large covered NEW REFINISHED balcony to enjoy your morning coffee. Spacious open concept with brand NEW laminate flooring and NEW paint. Kitchen updates include NEW Whirlpool stainless stove and fridge. Insuite laundry has a NEW Frigidaire washer and dryer. 1 parking and 1 large sized storage locker. Pro-active strata-new roof in 2014. Close to Moody Park, Walmart, New West Public Library, Moody Arenas, Massey Theatre and Royal City Shopping Centre. Schools include Lord Kelvin Elementary and New Westminister Secondary. Also a bus ride away from the New Westminister Skytrain Station. Call today for a showing! Don't miss out on this one!!
Read Full Story
I have sold a property at 3708 WAKEFIELD CRT in Burnaby.
This rare 10,641 sqft property is private, safe & conveniently located at a corner of a quiet CUL DE SAC with 4 private parking. A central location with mountain views, 5 beds, 3.5 baths, 2 fireplaces, many updates & brand new additions - quartz kitchen countertop & major appliances, flooring, exterior lightings, & Italian tile front porch. 3043 sqft of living space & 940 sq ft storage & a huge private backyard is perfect for BBQs, family or professional activities & is a gardener's delight. It's minutes walking distatance to schools & close to shopping, parks & highway. Own this beautiful home to live, rent out part or all of the house or build your new luxury home. The availability of such a rare property is an opportunity you don't want to miss. Act now!!
Read Full Story
I have sold a property at 1105 6540 BURLINGTON AVE in Burnaby.
"Burlington Square" is a hidden gem which is close to Metrotown Centre
Read Full Story
I have sold a property at 106 5500 ARCADIA RD in Richmond.
Central location; South-faced; Walking distance to supermarket, Lansdowne Mall, skytrain, bank; Across the street from Kwantlen University; wood floor, free fireplace heating in winter. Meas approx, buyer to verify.
Read Full Story
I have listed a new property at 2002 13380 108 AVE in Surrey.
City Point 2, Beautiful 2 bed, 2 bath. Amenities such as Waves Coffee, FreshSlice Pizza, & a convenience store are housed on the main floor of City Point. You're one quick Skytrain stop to SFU Surrey, the 75,000 square foot LEED certified City Centre Library designed by master architect Bing Thom, the new Performing Arts Centre, & the new City Hall. Instead, head to Central City Shopping Centre, home to over 130 stores, including T&T Supermarket, Bed Bath & Beyond, & Winners; stay healthy at Club 16 Trevor Linden Fitness; or visit one of the many restaurants, or government, financial, or medical services - all practically right at your doorstep! Schools are K.B. Woodward Elementary or Kwantlen Park Secondary.
Read Full Story

RE/MAX Awards


Awarded the RE/MAX 100% Club Award

100   new 2010


 
 

RE/MAX Awards


Awarded the RE/MAX Executive Club Award

f executive logo a

Post CommentComments: 0Read Full Story

10 Things to Do Before You Sell


Before you put your house on the market, ask me for guidance on improving your home's presentation. I can tell you what buyers expect in your particular market and at your home's price point. The following 10 steps are a way to get a good head start on preparing to sell your home.

 

1. Welcome buyers. Make your front door visible and accessible to buyers. Paint the door, clear debris and clutter from the walkway and yard, mow the lawn and prune hedges. Pot or plant colorful annuals and perennials to attract attention from the street. Fix broken screens, doorbells, roof tiles, shingles and outdoor lighting, and replace your doormat. Exterior defects can make a poor first impression on buyers.

 

2. Make it sparkle. Cleanliness implies a home has been well taken care of, so deep cleaning can win points with buyers. Buyers scrutinize homes, especially kitchens and bathrooms. Recaulk and repaint to give these grime-prone rooms a fresh and clean look. Clean rugs and carpets to eliminate unsightly stains or dinginess and eliminate odors. Tidy each room, including cabinets, closets and the garage, before showing. And if it seems daunting to do all that cleaning yourself, consider hiring a professional cleaning company to take care of all of it for you.

 

3. Start packing. Cramped and cluttered rooms turn buyers off and make your house look smaller. A home packed with your personal belongings also makes it difficult for others to envision living there. Start by storing away excess furniture, toys and personal decorations, such as family photos. Pack up things you don't use on a daily basis, and put them in storage or ask a friend to hold onto them. Decluttering your house also gives you a head start on your move.

 

4. Paint wisely. A well-done, no-frills paint job is all you need. Put a fresh coat of paint on white or beige walls, and repaint walls that have eccentric or unconventional colors. Nature- and spa-inspired neutral colors, such as taupe and subtle gray, are the best choices. Definitely don't forget the trim and molding either. And a fresh paint job on outdated or worn cabinetry goes a long way, too.

 

5. Fix the small stuff. Repair or replace broken or outdated hardware throughout your home. You can install new door handles, faucets, towel bars and curtain rods – fixtures that are readily visible to homebuyers – rather inexpensively. New hardware in the bathroom, kitchen and on windows and doors also improves the functionality and safety of these components.

 

6. Update lighting. Replace decorative light fixtures that no longer fit your home's cleaner, fresher look. Install new bulbs with the appropriate lighting for specific areas of your home. For example, ambient, low-key lighting fills a room, whereas directional or task lighting works better in areas like a reading nook. Use accent lighting to highlight focal points in a room, such as the artwork above a mantle, to draw buyers' attention to certain selling points.

 

7. Frame windows. Ensure you have the right window treatments, which enhance natural brightness and boost the appearance of a home. Window treatments also can impact a room's temperature because they reduce or increase the amount of light entering the space. Adjust window treatments appropriately when showing your home in the mornings, afternoon and evenings.

 

8. Set the table. Fresh, decorative flowers in the kitchen or on the dining room table are always a nice touch. Also, keep place settings handy for your tables so you can quickly set them out right before showings or an open house. Pull out all the formal stops for a dining room, and keep the table casual in the kitchen.

 

9. Hide unsightly everyday items. Don't leave children's toys and pet belongings out in the open during showings and open houses. Move litter boxes, pet dishes, toys, animal crates and kids' entertainment to less conspicuous areas of the home, such as an outdoor storage unit or garage before each showing or open house. Also think about where you can store things like dirty laundry and dirty kitchen sponges.

 

10. Don't forget the back. Keep your backyard looking spacious and functional. Plant or pot colorful flowers and keep the landscaping trimmed and neat. Consistently pick up after your pets so buyers feel comfortable touring the yard.

Post CommentComments: 0Read Full Story

Six Pricing Mistakes Every Seller Can Avoid


If you’re getting ready to sell your home, you want to get the most money for your investment, right? One of the key factors that will sell your home is price, and having a sound pricing strategy is a must if you want to find the right buyer.

Here are six common pricing mistakes all sellers should avoid.

 

1. Overpricing from the start – You might think your home is the best on the block and should command a price relative to the value you see. Wrong. You have to appeal to the value homebuyers see. Overpricing your home at the onset could leave out strong potential buyers, especially if recent sales and other factors in your neighborhood don’t justify your listing price. You also run the risk of needing multiple price reductions, which keep your home on the market that much longer.

 

2. Leaving out potential buyers in online searches – Entering a price range is the first search parameter most homebuyers use to narrow down their options. If a buyer’s price range is, say, $250,000 to $300,000, they won’t see your home if it’s listed at $305,000. It might make sense to list it right at $300,000 so that you capture potential buyers in the ranges above and below. Ultimately, this is up to you and your agent, but the range your home's price falls into is certainly worth thinking about – especially if you're teetering between price ranges anyway.

 

3. Not considering recently sold properties – To arrive at a listing price that will generate buyer interest, you can’t base your price solely on the prices of other homes in your area that are listed for sale. You also need to consider recent sales in your neighborhood and the final sale prices. An experienced agent can provide you with information on recent sales to help you see the bigger picture.

 

4. Getting too creative with your asking price – Make it easy for buyers and pick round numbers. Listing a home for $512,477, for example, will give potential buyers pause about your intentions and divert attention from your property to you, as the seller. Maybe it's best to save the creative juices for the property description.

 

5. Not being open to negotiation – The quickest way to kill a sale is to dig in your heels on asking price before the for-sale sign even goes in the yard. Negotiation is a two-way street, and if you refuse to budge on pricing or other conditions, you might be in for very bumpy (and long) ride. Ask yourself: Is it more important to get full asking price, or can you make a few concessions to find common ground that will ensure a closed sale?

 

6. Ignoring your agent’s insights – The best route to the right price starts withpicking a great agent and then listening to his or her advice. Your agent will look at your situation from all angles – your home's features, the local market, recent sales and more – to help you make an informed decision about pricing.  

 

Ready to list your home? I can help you price it right and get it sold.​​

Post CommentComments: 0Read Full Story

5 Real Estate Myths:Beware these common beliefs that often snag buyers and sellers


5 Real Estate Myths:Beware these common beliefs that often snag buyers and sellers

When you buy or sell a home, you're likely to get lots of unsolicited advice from friends and family. Some of that advice might be helpful while some of it might not be so helpful. When it comes to real estate, people tend to make generalizations based on their own experiences when the reality is more nuanced.

 

Here are some examples:

 

1. "You should wait to list your home until the spring." Yes, real estate is seasonal. In some cities this is more apparent than others, especially places with harsh winter weather. When real estate company Redfin crunched the numbers over the past five years, we found that 51 per cent of homes listed in the winter sold above asking price, compared with 50 per cent in the spring.

If you want the best shot at selling your home quickly and for the most money, list in the first half of the year. The percentage of homes that sold over asking price dropped to 44 per cent and 43 per cent in the summer and fall respectively in our region. Ultimately, the difference between selling in the winter and spring is negligible. Pricing and marketing strategy is the most likely to sell.

 

2. "Look for a deal during the holidays." I've seen many buyers who were convinced they could score a great deal on a home by looking around the holidays. There is a nugget of truth to this concept. Fewer buyers are looking during this time period. Sellers who list during the holidays might be selling due to necessity, like a job relocation, and therefore be more motivated to sell quickly. Sale price is ultimately a function of market dynamics and less a function of the season. The key is to be patient. I also suggest buyers look at homes that have been on the market for a bit of time. These might be good opportunities for negotiating a sale under asking price.

 

3. "You don't need an inspection for a new build or recent renovation." Some buyers are under the impression that they can forgo the inspection for a property that is new or recently renovated. From an improperly installed dryer vent to faulty wiring, new developments can have minor and major problems that aren't apparent until you get a professional to do a review. While there might be competitive reasons to waive the inspection contingency in the contract, the decision to do so should not be taken lightly and should be made with full knowledge of the risks.

 

4. "Your home is updated and in a good neighbourhood so you don't need to stage it to sell." Even the most beautiful, highend homes should be staged and photographed by a professional photographer. Listing photos are a critical factor in the selling price of your home, how quickly it sells, and whether it sells at all. Our agents found that homes with professional listings photos sold faster and for more money, as much as several thousand dollars more. A professional stager can provide objective advice on how to get your home photo-ready. They see a lot of homes so they can speak to design trends and features that are common in homes for sale in your area.

 

5. "Price your home above the amount you want to get, so you have room to negotiate." Determining what your list price should be is an art and a science. Before you list your home, ask your real estate agent for a comparative market analysis, which will help you determine a reasonable price based on sales of similar homes in your area. A Redfin study showed that the first week a listing goes on the market it receives nearly four times more visits online than it does a month later. Even if you drop the price later, it won't get the same attention. When in doubt, start with a lower asking price.

 

By Marshall Park, The Washington Post

Post CommentComments: 0Read Full Story

Tips On Moving


Tips for the Moving Process

 

It’s official:  you’ve signed the papers, dotted all the i’s and crossed the t’s—you own a new home!  You’ve almost reached the end of your journey.  However, now, faced with the daunting task of moving, it may seem as though the journey has just begun.  Moving can be a time-consuming and stressful experience if you let yourself be overwhelmed by the job.  Remember, though, having a successful move means taking care of the details, one by one.  If you break the process down into steps and arrange your time accordingly, you can make it manageable.  Use the following checklist to ensure you’re covering all the bases, and you will be well on your way to a successful move!

 

Household

 

  • Arrange to have your mail forwarded to your new address.
  • Forward or cease all deliveries to your home, and forward or cancel newspaper and magazine subscriptions.
  • Disconnect or take care of utility, cable and phone services and accounts.
  • Arrange for utilities to be connected at your new house.
  • Cancel pre-authorized bill payments.
  • Begin going through closets and discarding any unnecessary items.

 

Packing

 

  • Plan your packing.  Start by purchasing or acquiring suitable containers.  Most moving companies have specialized containers you can buy.  Also, speak with others who have recently moved—they may be looking to get rid of boxes.  You’ll need the following:  small boxes for heavy items (books, tools, etc.); large boxes for bulky items (bedding, stuffed toys, etc.); medium boxes for bulky but less heavy items (towels, small appliances, etc.).
  • Begin to collect other packing materials.  Decide which items you’ll need from the following checklist:

-White paper

-Tissue paper

-Paper towels

-Newspapers

-Non-printed paper

-Packing tape or twine to seal boxes and containers

-Scissors

-Labels and stickers (available from your moving company)

-Felt marker to label boxes

-Notebook and pen for listing contents

  • Set goals and deadlines for yourself.  Aim, for example, to pack one room per week. 
  • Attach a list of contents to each box.  Separate and label boxes to be placed in storage.
  • Consider holding a garage sale to rid yourself of excess belongings.
  • Begin to use up the food in your pantry and freezer.  Let the food you already have dictate your menus.
  • Have rugs cleaned that are to be moved, then roll and wrap them.
  • Make special arrangements for the moving of plants or pets.
  • Collect all personal items from local services (dry cleaning, storage, photos).
  • Service all appliances you are taking with you.  Note that all gas appliances must be emptied, as it is illegal for movers to carry flammable substances.
  • Take inventory of all the boxes, and contents of the boxes, you have packed.
  • Have your car serviced and tuned up.

 

Community

 

  • Return library books.
  • Clean out your locker at any club you are leaving.
  • Determine how to transfer your children to a new school.
  • Return items you’ve borrowed to friends, and collect any you’ve lent.
  • Mail or e-mail change of address notices to family members, friends, and office contacts.

 

Records

 

  • If needed, transfer medical and dental records, and fill prescriptions.
  • Change the address on your driver’s license.
  • Change the billing address for credit cards.
  • Change the address for banking statements.
  • Leave a record of security codes for new tenants.

 

Insurance and Legal Matters

 

  • Visit your lawyer and ensure all documents are signed.
  • Notify your insurance company well in advance of the move and ask them to review your policy. 
  • Transfer insurance to your new home, or acquire new insurance.
  • Review your moving company’s insurance policy.  If it doesn’t cover as much as you’d like it to, obtain your own.
  • If you are currently renting a house or apartment, give written notice to the landlord.
  • Have all keys to your old home delivered to your lawyer or realtor.
Post CommentComments: 0Read Full Story

8 Mistakes to Avoid When Buying a Home


8 Mistakes to Avoid When Buying a Home

 

You’ve been saving for awhile, weighing your options, looking around casually.  Now you’ve finally decided to do it—you’re ready to buy a house.  The process of buying a new home can be incredibly exciting, yet stressful, all at once.  Where do you start?

 

It is essential you do your homework before you begin.  Learn from the experiences of others, do some research.  Of course, with so many details involved, slip-ups are inevitable.  But be careful:  learning from your mistakes may prove costly.  Use the following list of pitfalls as a guide to help you avoid the most common mistakes.

 

  1. Searching for houses without getting pre-approved by a lender:

 

Do not mistake pre-approval by a lender with pre-qualification.  Pre-qualification, the first step toward being pre-approved, will point you in the right direction, giving you an idea of the price range of houses you can comfortably afford.  Pre-approval, however, means you become a cash buyer, making negotiations with the seller much easier. 

 

  1. Allowing “first impressions” to overly influence your decision:

 

The first impression of a home has been cited as the single most influential factor guiding many purchasers’ choice to buy.  Make a conscious decision beforehand to examine a home as objectively as you can.  Don’t let the current owners’ style or lifestyle sway your judgment.  Beneath the bad décor or messy rooms, these homes may actually suit your needs and offer you a structurally sound base with which to work.  Likewise, don’t jump at a home simply because the walls are painted your favourite colour!  Make sure you thoroughly the investigate the structure beneath the paint before you come to any serious decisions. 

 

  1. Failing to have the home inspected before you buy:

 

Buying a home is a major financial decision that is often made after having spent very little time on the property itself.  A home inspection performed by a competent company will help you enter the negotiation process with eyes wide open, offering you added reassurance that the choice you’re making is a sound one, or alerting you to underlying problems that could cost you significant money in both the short and long-run.  Your Realtor can suggest reputable home inspection companies for you to consider and will ensure the appropriate clause is entered into your contract.

 

  1. Not knowing and understanding your rights and obligations as listed in the Offer to Purchase:

 

Make it a priority to know your rights and obligations inside and out.  A lack of understanding about your obligations may, at the very least, cause friction between yourself and the people with whom you are about to enter the contract.  Wrong assumptions, poorly written/ incomprehensible/ missing clauses, or a lack of awareness of how the clauses apply to the purchase, could also contribute to increased costs.  These problems may even lead to a void contract.  So, take the time to go through the contract with a fine-tooth comb, making use of the resources and knowledge offered by your Realtor and lawyer.  With their assistance, ensure you thoroughly understand every component of the contract, and are able to fulfill your contractual obligations.

 

  1. Making an offer based on the asking price, not the market value:

 

Ask your Realtor for a current Comparative Market Analysis.  This will provide you with the information necessary to gauge the market value of a home, and will help you avoid over-paying.  What have other similar homes sold for in the area and how long were they on the market?  What is the difference between their asking and selling prices?  Is the home you’re looking at under-priced, over-priced, or fair value?  The seller receives a Comparative Market Analysis before deciding upon an asking price, so make sure you have all the same information at your fingertips.

 

  1. Failing to familiarize yourself with the neighbourhood before buying:

 

Check out the neighbourhood you’re considering, and ask around.  What amenities does the area have to offer?  Are there schools, churches, parks, or grocery stores within reach?  Consider visiting schools in the area if you have children.  How will you be affected by a new commute to work?  Are there infrastructure projects in development?  All of these factors will influence the way you experience your new home, so ensure you’re well-acquainted with the surrounding area before purchasing.

 

  1. Not looking for home insurance until you are about to move:

 

If you wait until the last minute, you’ll be rushed to find an insurance policy that’s the ideal fit for you.  Make sure you give yourself enough time to shop around in order to get the best deal.

 

  1. Not recognizing different styles and strategies of negotiation:

 

Many buyers think that the way to negotiate their way to a fair price is by offering low.  However, in reality this strategy may actually result in the seller becoming more inflexible, polarizing negotiations.  Employ the knowledge and skills of an experienced realtor.  S/he will know what strategies of negotiation will prove most effective for your particular situation. 

Post CommentComments: 0Read Full Story

Why You Need A Home Inspector


In your excitement to buy a home, it's easy to miss a small crack in the foundation, some leaky pipes under the house, or a roof that needs to be replaced.

The sellers worked hard to make the home look as desirable as possible, but looks don't tell the whole story. That's where your home inspection comes in.

What about inspections for sellers?

For sellers, a home inspection is also a good idea prior to listing the home for sale. An inspection can help you turn up issues ahead of time so there will be no surprises when serious buyers start inquiring. Knowing in advance means you'll be able to consider all your options – either making repairs before listing or pricing your home to account for anything you're not going to fix.

What does a home inspection include?

A general home inspection will evaluate the house and adjoining structures from top to bottom, inside and out, including but not limited to:

Outside Roof, porches, driveways, garage, drainage, retaining walls, grading, and plants or vegetation that may impact the home's condition

Inside Electrical and plumbing systems; foundation; heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems; water heater, septic system, electrical system, windows, doors, floors, ceilings and walls

What a home inspection doesn't cover The home inspector can't make any alterations in the course of inspecting a home – so there’s no digging up the ground, lifting carpets, knocking out walls, etc.

Also consider that a home comprises tens of thousands of parts, pieces, nooks and crannies. An inspector will look at a representative sampling, but there's simply no way to check every single element.

Tip: Many home inspectors know about major appliance recalls, but do your own research by noting model numbers and then checking for trouble online.

Tip: If an area of the house is not accessible because of barricades, such as boxes piled in front of a door, request that the seller remove these to allow for a thorough inspection.

Specialized Inspections – When Do You Need One?

Some cities require additional inspections on top of a general inspection. Beyond that, you may just want a specialized inspection due to a special circumstance or particular concern you or your general inspector may have.

Examples of specialized inspections:
• Sewer inspection
• Chimney inspection
• Mold inspection
• Lead inspection
• Asbestos inspection
• Pest inspection
• Inspection of a special feature such as swimming pool or hot tub
 

Tip: If a home inspector tells you not to attend the inspection, find someone else. This is a classic red flag.

Post CommentComments: 0Read Full Story

Home Improvements


You want to invest in your home – wisely. So how do you decide where to put your money?

Improvement projects don’t automatically increase the value of a home – factors like the state of the neighborhood can be more important to your bottom line. But knowing which improvements give a higher return can help boost your home’s value and save you time and money. 

Here’s a quick look at how you could prioritize projects around your home.

Address the small stuff
A home plagued with many minor issues is usually considered less desirable and harder to sell. Those dripping faucets, running toilets, torn vinyl flooring and damaged carpet instantly make a bad impression on buyers. Put your money into those first and use what’s left to make larger improvements.

Boost curb appeal
It comes as no surprise that exterior home improvement projects rank as the most cost effective, according to Remodeling magazine’s 2014 Cost vs. Value Report. It ranks projects based on their cost and how much money they recoup after selling.

96 percent – Replace a wooden front door with a steel security door
87 percent – Add a new deck
78 percent – Replace siding
78 percent – Install a new garage door
78 percent – Install new windows

Consider interior investments
84 percent – Convert an attic to a bed and bath
82 percent – Minor kitchen remodel
77 percent – Basement renovation

If you’re thinking about selling your home, talk to me to evaluate what to change or replace.  I know your neighborhood, and can guide you toward projects that will make the home buyer-ready and also give you the biggest bang for your home-improvement buck.

Post CommentComments: 0Read Full Story

Anatomy of a Home Purchase


For most people, finding the right home begins with a house-hunting strategy combining personal preferences, guidance from others (including me) and a mix of neighborhood exploring and online search.

 

For some, the search takes a while; others find what they want right away. In either case, I can be a huge resource of insight and guidance, working through issues or complications that arise along the way.

 

Here’s a general outline of what to expect during a home purchase, from the buyer's perspective.

Buyers make a purchase offer. This is it! You've found the home of your dreams, looked over disclosure documents, reviewed comparable sales data, talked it over with your agent and submitted an offer. The sellers may accept your first offer, but more often will return a counteroffer. In fact, additional negotiations are common, and your agent will help you through this generally stressful stage.

 

The sellers accept. Once everyone is happy with the terms, the parties have reached what is known as mutual acceptance and enter into a purchase and sale agreement.

 

Buyers put up earnest money. To solidify your intent to buy, you'll place a deposit, or earnest money, on the property. The amount varies, but is generally at least 1 percent of the purchase price. You'll write the check to the escrow company, not the seller. Note: This money counts toward your down payment later.

 

Escrow opens. The earnest money deposit goes into an escrow account, where all funds will be held until closing, when they are then distributed to the right people (lender, mortgage broker, title insurer, real estate agents, etc.).

 

Buyers apply for a mortgage. This step is streamlined if you've already been preapproved for a loan (which is a smart thing to do). If not, you'll begin the loan application process now.

 

The lender inspects title history and orders a property appraisal. The lender needs key information about the property before granting a loan. This is when potential problems can come to light. For example, the appraisal could show a lower value than the purchase price, or the lender could have trouble finding comparable homes. Also, the title search could turn up liens or other problems.

 

A home inspection takes place. You'll hire an inspector – generally, your agent will suggest one, or provide several options – to check the home and point out minor and major problems that should be fixed before closing. At this point, you still have the option of backing out of the deal. Through your agent, you'll submit a list of requested work, and the sellers have the option to complete the tasks, do some of them but not others, or reject the request. The sides will negotiate until reaching an agreement.

 

Removing contingencies. If the house passes inspection, appraisal and title search, and everything is good to go, then all contingencies can be removed, paving the way to a closing.

 

Closing time arrives. Once contingencies are removed and financing is set, all parties sign a seemingly endless stack of documents, and the transaction closes.

 

Packing begins! When the final signatures are in place, it’s time to put down the pens, shake hands, exchange smiles and start packing for the move!

 
Post CommentComments: 0Read Full Story